The Burren

The Burren

The Burren

Wild Honey Inn is ideally located on the edge of The Burren – an area of spectacular beauty, a rocky landscape with a history and geology going back millions of year.

As a guest at our Inn, you are well placed to enjoy all that The Burren has to offer. Whether it’s walking the limestone pavement, cycling along the flaggy shore or following a cultural, musical or Burren Food trail through the area – it’s all right on our doorstep.

The smallest of six National Parks in Ireland, the Burren National Park is around 250 square kilometres. It is enclosed by the rough circle made by the quaint and picturesque villages of Ballyvaughan, Kinvara, Tubber, Corofin, Kilfenora and Lisdoonvarna.

The name ‘Burren’ comes from the Irish word Boíreann, meaning ‘a rocky place’). This describes the Karst landscape which is underlain by limestone slabs and which would have covered the whole of Ireland some 360 million years ago. It comprises miles upon miles of swirling, gently folding rock, tiers, hollows and pavements – which, in some places, is more than 700m thick. From ash and hazel woodland to grassland, cliffs and fen, the countryside here is rich in flora and is an area of great conservation.

“Hanna loved the little house at Boolavaun: four rooms, a porch full of geraniums, a mountain out the back and, out the front, a sky full of weather. If you crossed the long meadow, you came to a boreen which brought you up over a small rise to a view of the Aran Islands out in Galway Bay, and the Cliffs of Moher, which were also famous, far away to the south. This road turned into the green road that went across the Burren, high above the beach at Fanore, and this was the most beautiful road in the world, bar none:”

- The Green Road by Anne Enright

To See and Do

Follow the history and mystery of the Burren – an area with more than 90 megalithic tombs, portal dolmens, a Celtic high cross in the village of Kilfenora and a number of ring forts, all in the area.

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